Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Spring 2020 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Spring 2020 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2020 Spring Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


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Read it now!

Spring 2020 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Pining for a Parks District
  • Albertina Kerr Housing Update
  • Wilkes East Land-Use Update
  • Glisan Street Lane Reduction

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

Albertina Kerr Workforce and Inclusive Housing Project Update, February 2020

Albertina Kerr Workforce and Inclusive Housing Project Update, February 2020. Gresham campus. Construction starts August 2020. Completion September 2021. Info here!
Albertina Kerr Workforce and Inclusive Housing. Entry, Gresham campus. Click to enlarge.

By: Jeff Carr
CEO, Albertina Kerr
www.albertinakerr.org/

Albertina Kerr continues to move forward and make progress on its Workforce and Inclusive Housing Project to be located on the Gresham campus at 722 NE 162 Avenue. The project will include 150 units, from studios to 3 bedrooms. Since the November Wilkes East Neighborhood meeting where a presentation was made, significant progress has been made:

  • Site due diligence was completed in December 2019 (Geotech, surveying, arborist report)
  • A Design Review Consult was completed with the City of Gresham Community Design Review Committee in December 2019
  • 100% Schematic Design was completed in early January 2020
    Submittals were completed for land use review in early January 2020
  • Albertina Kerr hit the $1 million private fundraising mark in December 2020 and only needs $200,000 more in private donations to hit the total goal of $1.2 million in private donations.

One significant change since the November meeting is that we have decided to pursue making the building “net zero” from an energy use standpoint, which means we will be adding enhancements to make the entire building more energy efficient and producing energy via solar panels to provide enough energy to operate the entire building year-round.

The current timeline for the project is as follows:

Goal Date
Complete 100% schematic design January-2020 - Done
Submit for land use January-2020 - Done
Complete 50% design development February-2020
Land use public hearing March-2020
Complete 100% design development April-2020
Update hard cost & proforma May-2020
Land use approval May-2020
Submit for building permit May-2020
Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) July-2020
Permit Issued August-2020
Construction Start August-2020
Construction Complete September-2021

We continue to be excited about this project and what it will mean for direct care workers at Albertina Kerr and others who care for some of the most vulnerable members of our community.

Architect Images

Alberina Kerr Workforce and Inclusive Housing. Gresham campus. NE 162nd Ave view. Click to enlarge
NE 162nd Ave view. Click to enlarge
Alberina Kerr Workforce and Inclusive Housing. Greshma campus. NE Holladay St view. Click to enlarge
NE Holladay St view. Click to enlarge

About Albertine Kerr
For more than 100 years, Albertina Kerr has been caring for Oregon’s most vulnerable citizens. Over the decades, our services have evolved to meet the community’s needs. While these needs have changed, the values of our expert caregivers remain constant: compassion, commitment, collaboration, and advocacy.

Today, Kerr empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), mental health challenges, and other social barriers to lead self-determined lives and reach their full potential. We provide comprehensive crisis and preventative mental health care for children and teens, as well as a full range of services for children and adults with IDD.

Learn more at www.albertinakerr.org

Nadaka Nature Park future uncertain; community members call for dedicated recreation funding

Nadaka Nature Park won't have much of a reason to celebrate the new year.

Nadaka Nature Park future uncertain; community members call for dedicated recreation funding. Lee Dayfield said a parks district funding mechanism is the best option for maintaining Nadaka Nature Park, which lost its fiscal agent and programming at the end of 2019. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Lee Dayfield said a parks district funding mechanism is the best option for maintaining Nadaka Nature Park, which lost its fiscal agent and programming at the end of 2019. Click to enlarge

By Christopher Keizur
Source: Gresham Outlook (Oct 18, 2019)

The beautiful green space in the heart of the Wilkes East Neighborhood will be empty after losing its fiscal agent — transforming what was once thought of as the model for future parks in Gresham into just another open area. Despite the work that has been poured into the park, residents will have less of a reason to visit than ever before.

"It almost makes me cry to walk through here and know all those kids won't be coming here to be educated," said Lee Dayfield. "This park was their backyard, playground and forest."

There is no better person to talk to about Nadaka Nature Park than Dayfield. She spearheaded the charge to transform her dream park into a reality. She overcame red tape and bureaucracy, founding Friends of Nadaka to help secure grants and other funding.

The Columbia Slough Watershed Council, a Portland-based organization, had supported the Gresham park since its inception. But with some changes to the board and executive director, the group has decided to focus on other projects.

The backing for Nadaka will end when the money runs dry, which is estimated to happen in January 2020. That means no more activities — from community cleanups to educational gatherings for local schoolchildren — that made the park so special.

"They were so strong and supportive of us for seven years," Dayfield said. "People will notice a big difference."

Click "Read more" (below) to continue reading this article.

2020 Portland Eastside Farmer's Markets. Garden Fresh Produce Available Year-round

2020 Portland Eastside Farmer's Markets. Garden Fresh Produce Available Year-round. Find a farmer's markets here!

S-t-r-e-t-c-h  your grocery dollar!

Enjoy the freshest produce, flowers, and plant starts direct from the garden.

Healthy and fresh
Farmer’s markets are a fantastic source for fresh, seasonal, locally produced foods and artisan products. Plus, you'll find great activities and fun for the whole family. Come experience the markets. Meet the vendors. Meet local cooks. Enjoy the freshest produce and products. Make your own statement in support of local food.

Want to grow your own vegetables?
Check out Portland Nursery's 12-month "Veggie Calendar" planting guide here.

2020 Portland's Eastside Farmer's Markets

(Complete details on these area markets below)

You'll find plenty of root vegetables, braising greens and lettuces, and of course plant starts for your own vegetable garden.

Bring your reusable shopping bags and plenty of small bills, though some of the markets will trade you a credit/debit card for wooden tokens that all vendors accept, which can be easier to handle than cash. We've indicated those markets that accept EBT or other food assistant coupons.

Are you prepared for a winter storm? Groceries and emergency supplies you need in case of snow

Are you prepared for a winter storm? Here are the groceries and other supplies you should add to your shopping list. Info here!

During extremely cold weather or winter storms, staying warm and safe can be a challenge.

Winter storms can bring cold temperatures, strong winds, power failures, loss of communications, and icy roads.

Here's a list of groceries and emergency supplies you need in case of snow.

Items that don’t require refrigeration or heat to prepare

  • Nut butters, jams and jellies
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Dried fruits and nuts
  • Juices (particularly those that are not commonly found in the refrigerator section of the supermarket)
  • Breads, muffins, bagels, tortillas
  • Dry cereal or granola
  • Canned milk or non-dairy milk in aseptic cartons
  • Protein bars and protein shakes
  • Jarred sauces such as salsa, ketchup, or mustard.
  • Pickles or foods preserved in vinegar
  • Hard cheeses, such as cheddar, Swiss, provolone and parmesan, processed cheeses, and Edam (just make sure the cheese is well wrapped and sealed)

Other items to add to your list if you don’t have them

  • A non-electric can opener
  • Charcoal or propane for the outdoor grill
  • Pet food
  • Kitty litter
  • Paper towels, paper plates, and plastic utensils (useful if the power goes out and you can’t wash dishes)
  • Toilet paper
  • Water (1 gal per person per 3 days)
  • Other storm essentials

    • Rock salt for melting ice on sidewalks and driveway
    • An ice scraper for your car’s windshield
    • A sturdy snow shovel
    • Foam insulation covers for exterior faucets
    • First-aid kit
    • Flashlight, with batteries
    • Extra batteries, just in case

    Good to have on hand when you’re going to be cooped-up

    • Favorite baking supplies for cookies and quickbread (flour, sugar, salt, eggs, butter)
    • Cartons of chicken or vegetable broth for making soup (a good excuse to use up what’s already in your vegetable bin)
    • Canned soup
    • Comfort food (mac ‘n’ cheese, pasta, potatoes. yum)
    • Favorite snacks (popcorn, chips, etc.)
    • Apple cider
    • Coffee and tea
    • Wine and beer
    • Liquor

    Now that you're ready you can relax and enjoy a snow day!

    Source: The Oregonian/Oregonlive.com

When A Natural Emergency Strikes Will You and Your Family Be Ready?

Experts Warn Cascadia Is Overdue For A 9.0 Earthquake

When A Natural Emergency Strikes Will You and Your Family Be Ready? Here's some great tips and valuable resources to help you be prepared for a disaster. Info here!

Be informed.
Build a kit.
Make a plan.

Everyday you hear the warnings.
Have you made a kit?
Do you have a plan?

If you're like most of us - you're not ready.

If that's you, we've got some great tips and valuable resources below to help you be prepared for whenever a disaster strikes.

CONTENTS

TICK. TOCK.
Think of Oregon geology as a clock, measuring time in earthquakes. Tick: a magnitude 8 quake. (Bigger than 1989 Bay Area quake that killed 63 people.) Tock: a magnitude 9 quake. (Same as the 2011 Japan quake that killed almost 16,000 people.) On average, a major quake happens in our area every 243 years, the last one was January 26, 1700 — 316 years ago. Yes. We are overdue.

When the next Big One does happen, a 700-mile long section of the tectonic plate known as the Juan de Fuca, stretching from British Columbia to Northern California, will slide beneath the North American plate, causing the entire Northwest coast-line to sink up to 6.6 feet. This won’t be a California-style short burst of energy quake in the earth’s upper crust. The Big One will be bigger, deeper, and last longer: 3–4 minutes, with dozens of after-shocks, some very powerful, for days, months, or later.

The Cascadia Subduction Zone is 700 miles long, located 100-150 miles off shore of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and northern California. Info here!
Cascadia Subduction Zone. Pacific Northwest. Click to Enlarge.

Hillsides will slide. Buildings will collapse. Roads will buckle. High-rises will sway. Bridges will crack. Some will fall. Pipes will snap. Within 20 minutes, the first of several 40-foot tsunami waves will wash away the Oregon Coast’s low-lying towns.

If our next “subduction zone” quake unleashes its full potential, it will be the worst natural disaster in U.S. history.

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Fall 2019 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Fall 2019 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2019 Fall Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=
Read it now!

Fall 2019 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Albertina Kerr Workforce Housing
  • WENA Board Elections Nov 11th
  • Extreme Weather In Our Region
  • Nadaka Happenings & Changes
  • Update: A Playground For Kirk Park

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2019 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2019 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2019 Summer Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=
Read it now!

Summer 2019 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Columbia View Park improvements
  • National Night Out, Tuesday Aug 6th
  • Back to School, Movies in the Park
  • Nadaka Happenings & Changes
  • WENA Meeting Mon, Aug 12, 6:30PM

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

What is the Dog Days of Summer?

Tagged:  

The “dog days of summer” occur during the hottest and muggiest part of summer

It's a dogs life, especially during summer. Learn the origin of 'dog days of summer' here!
Dog Days of Summer?  Click to enlarge

The dictionary defines “dog days” as:

1:  the period between early July and early September when the hot sultry weather of summer usually occurs in the northern hemisphere
2:  a period of stagnation or inactivity

But where does the term come from? Why do we call the hot, sultry days of summer “dog days?” Here's the answer!

In ancient times, when the night sky was free from artificial lights people in different parts of the world drew images in the sky by “connecting the dots” of stars. These star pictures are called constellations, and the constellations as we know them came from our European ancestors.

Ancient star gazer's saw images in the stars of bears (Ursa Major and Ursa Minor), twins (Gemini), a bull (Taurus), and others objects, including dogs (Canis Major and Canis Minor). Click 'Read more' for the answer!

The Tale of Two Wilkes Neighborhoods

The Tale of Two Wilkes Neighborhoods. William C Wilkes Donation Land Grant 1846, Portland Oregon. Info here!
Click to enlarge

Love, Heartbreak, and Renewal

Local history says un the summer of 1845 Payton & Anna Wilkes and their seven children left Independence Missouri in a two-yolk oxen-drawn covered wagon and headed west on the Oregon Trail for Oregon.

They arrived by late fall after crossing the Cascade Mountains during a particularly strong snow storm and settled into their new life style in Oregon City. More than 3,000 wagons arrived in Oregon that year.

In 1850 their son William Wilkes took a Donation Land Claim on Sandy Road east of Portland.

The Donation Land Claim Act (DLC) became law on September 27, 1850 as a means to promote homestead settlements in the Oregon Territory (comprising the resent-day states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho and part of Wyoming).

The Act granted 320 acres of designated areas free-of-charge to every unmarried male citizen eighteen or older, and 640 acres to every married couple arriving in the Oregon Territory before December 1, 1850. A total of 7,437 land claims were issued under the Act which expired in late 1855.

Soon after receiving his land, William gave up his claim after his wife died and headed to California to mine gold.

Rich with cash, William Wilkes returned to east Portland and purchased the Milton Frazer DLC (see photo above), which was located immediately to the east of his original claim. And that's why there are two Wilkes neighborhoods.

Wilkes, the original land claim. And, Wilkes East, the purchased land to the east of William Wilkes original claim.

William C Wilkes, east Portland pioneer 1850's. Click to enlarge
William C Wilkes
Click to enlarge
William C Wilkes, east Portland pioneer 1850's. Click to enlarge
William C Wilkes grave
Click to enlarge
Sarah A Wilkes, wife of William C Wilkes, east Portland pioneer 1850's. Click to enlarge
Sarah A Wilkes
Click to enlarge

To learn more about local history, read "Gresham, Stories of our Past". Available from the Gresham Historical Society, area book stores, and Amazon.com

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